The Recovery Education Center

Expressing Emotions Through Art Helps in Recovery

At RHA Behavioral Health in High Point, NC, facilitators in the REC Center’s Creative Arts Group assisted participants with expressing emotions through art. They learned to connect their emotions and thoughts to colors, patterns, textures, and images. Some of the artwork created in the recovery class is personal and others have a theme. Most recently, participants were guided through an activity to help them process events in the area such as the devastation of hurricanes Matthew and Florence. They also discussed the aftermath of 9/11-how they were personally affected, and how their communities responded.

Darkness Turns to Light

Through art, they were given the opportunity to show what they all concluded: Darkness Turns to Light. In the panels on the left, participants chose color palettes and patterns to reflect what their storms (“Darkness”) look and feel like. They demonstrate turmoil, hate, destruction, chaos, devastation, loss, battles, hurricanes, tornados, and anything else that a storm can bring. The results of these storms can be physical, mental, financial, and emotional. They are painful.

The Light That Comes After the Darkness is Healing

In the panels on the right, participants chose color palettes and patterns to reflect what the aftermath of their storms (“Light”) looks and feels like. Specifically, they wanted to show the light that can come from darkness. These panels represent unity, peace, community, love, rebuilding, rising from the destruction, support, serenity, and gratitude. Surviving life’s storms can renew a person, a family, and a community. The light that comes after the storm is healing.

The contrasting colors and styles of design display the contrasting emotions and thoughts the participants experienced during and after recent storms, literally and metaphorically. By focusing on the light that comes after the darkness, participants have re-defined what it means to be survivors.

Written by Marissa Salvitti, NCCPSS
Recovery Education Center Class Facilitator
High Point Walk-In and Wellness Center

The RHA Recovery Education Center (REC) offers information, treatment and empowerment to people with mental health and substance use challenges. It provides an educational environment built around five key recovery concepts: hope, personal responsibility, self management education, and self-advocacy support. 

Learn more about our Outpatient Based Services below:

Outpatient Based Services

Alamance County “Steps Up”

There has been a sea change in the way police interact with people experiencing mental illness.

In his four decades in law enforcement Kirk Puckett, Director of Community Relations for the Alamance County, North Carolina Sheriff’s Department, has seen a sea change in the way that police interact with people who have mental illnesses in the criminal justice system. “It used to be that police had two options, either arrest that person and take them to jail or send them to the emergency department if they didn’t violate the law,” he said. “Many times we may not even have recognized the person had a mental illness.”

“Every time that a law enforcement officer brings someone in and helps them get connected to services instead of taking them to jail, we’ve done a good thing”, says Sara Huffman, Clinical Director for RHA Health Services which is the county’s crisis service contractor.

Using funding from a JMHCP grant, Alamance County was able to expand the reach of its Stepping Up initiative to include increasing the number of Crisis Intervention Team (CIT)-trained police officers as well as providing mental health first-aid training to detention and court staff, expanding a co-responder pilot program, and establishing a 24-hour diversion center. “We’re not treating people short term, we’re treating them for the long term,” says Puckett.

Since starting the Alamance County Stepping Up, more than 200 police officers have been CIT trained and more than 300 officers have received mental health first-aid training. information sharing has increased across behavioral health and criminal justice agencies, strengthening the collaboration between law enforcement and behavioral health.

To read the entire article and view the video:

 

 

 

NC Governor Roy Cooper Appoints RHA’s Jerry Wease to Commission

RUTHERFORD COUNTY, N.C. — Congratulations to Jerry Wease on his appointment by Governor Roy Cooper to the N.C. Commission for Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services. Jerry has been with the RHA ACT Team in Rutherford County for 4 years.  Two years ago he was promoted to Team Leader and has done an excellent job leading his staff in the service of the people they support.

Wease is a NAMI member and has earned certification as a LPC, LCAS, CSI, and NCC. After graduating at the top of his class from Gardner-Webb University with his MA/Ed.S in Mental Health Counseling, Jerry has provided clinical services and advocacy in many roles across the state from enhanced treatment services, clinical supervision, community advocacy, and teaching at the university level.

Jerry has worked with adolescents and adults with mental health and substance use disorders and primarily endorses a cognitive behavioral approach. Jerry believes that recovery is possible for individuals, families, and communities.

In his spare time Jerry enjoys volunteering, singing, animals, and sitting on the porch with a good book and a cup of coffee.

Thanks for your service not only to our community, but also to our state.

RHA is a Community Sponsor of the Blue Ridge Recovery Rally

RHA Health Services is proud to be a community sponsor of the second annual Blue Ridge Recovery Rally. The event is Saturday May 19th in Downtown Marion NC from 5 to 9pm.   All are welcome to this free family friendly atmosphere.  Activities include a walk and a 5K run, music and art, and guest speakers and recovery stories.

Communities across the country are struggling with addiction to substances such as alcohol, cocaine, heroin, and opioids.  The Blue Ridge Recovery Rally will celebrate, educate, and initiate positive change as we work together to build healthier communities.  Our goal at RHA Health Services is to help each person we support to understand their addictive disease and to establish a commitment to recovery.

Other community partners for the Blue Ridge Recovery Rally include, Vaya Health, the McDowell Chamber of Commerce, the City of Marion PD, A Caring Alternatives, The McDowell County Sheriffs Department, Freedom Life, Celebrate Recovery, Mission Hospital, and US Cellular.

For more information about the rally call 828-559-2224 or email info@freedomlifeministries.org.

RHA SAIOP Team Holds National Recovery Month Event

On Monday, September 11, 2017, the Burlington RHA SAIOP team held an event to simultaneously recognize September as National Recovery Month and the successful completion by three individuals of the SAIOP program. Every September SAMHSA sponsors Recovery Month to increase awareness and understanding of mental and substance use disorders and celebrate the people who recover. As reported on the SAMHSA website; “Recovery Month promotes the societal benefits of prevention, treatment, and recovery for mental and substance use disorders, celebrates people in recovery, lauds the contributions of treatment and service providers, and promotes the message that recovery in all its forms is possible. Recovery Month spreads the positive message that behavioral health is essential to overall health, prevention works, treatment is effective and people can and do recover.” Cole Shaughnessy, CSAC, CPSS, SAIOP facilitator, and Nancy Baraks, LCSW, LCAS, SAIOP team lead hosted the event inviting SAIOP alumni, Alcoholics Anonymous representative Jeff Palmer, and RHA service provider representatives to speak. RHA providers Vanessa Tribble, LCSW, Peer Support and Beverly Jones, LPC, LCASA, outpatient therapist, were asked to provide information on step-down service lines such as Peer Support Services and Substance Use group. Harvey Bryant, CSACA, Peer Support Specialist provided a personal message of support and encouragement to those on their recovery journey. Jeff Palmer shared his recovery story and information on the 12 step program as a continued support in the recovery community. The honored graduates from SAIOP are (pictured left to right) Elizabeth Valines, Cole Shaughnessy, CSAC, CPSS, Cheryl Harrell, and Rachel Smith. We encourage all to recognize and support those who continue their recovery journey and those who support and serve these individuals during this month.

The Opioid Crisis: One community fights back.

The opioid epidemic facing our country, state, and local neighborhoods is proving to be an extraordinary opponent, but the community stakeholders in New Hanover County and the City of Wilmington are rising to the call and fighting back.

RHA has had the opportunity over the past several months to participate in a multitude of initiatives to combat this health crisis and we are honored to work alongside a host of others dedicated to serving. Projects such as the LEAD project, the Quick Response Team pilot, medication drop off sites, and community forums are designed to make a difference in the lives of those affected by opiate misuse.

Whether it is first responders, city or county officials, educators, or behavioral health providers, everyone comes to the table as an equal partner possessing knowledge, expertise, and compassion with a common goal of making a difference.

Leaders in this effort include professionals and citizens who have looked past artificial boundaries and are banding together around several strategies aimed at creating a healthier, more informed community. SEAHEC is leading the charge with increasing awareness and educating the public through pulling people from all layers of community groups.

This story is all about the team work we have experienced and the solutions we have produced as a group. I personally have been humbled by everyone’s willingness to come to the table asking the question “How can I help? How can I serve?”  -Kathy Smith, Ph.D. Chief Operating Officer, RHA Health Services, Behavioral Health

Opioid Task Force
L-R Front Travis Robinson, Molly Daughtry, Deb Vuocolo, Kathy Smith, Olivia Herdon, Tony McEwen; Back Kenny House, Antonio Roper, Mitch Cunningham (Robert Childs not pictured)

Read the entire article

DHHS awards grant to Vaya Health for pilot program with RHA and Mission Health in Asheville

ASHEVILLE, N.C. (WLOS) — A $2.3 million grant from the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services to Vaya Health will help ensure people with mental health or addiction disorders receive proper outpatient care and avoid repeated trips to the hospital.

DHHS awarded grant funds to Vaya Health, a managed healthcare organization serving Western North Carolina, to fund the pilot program in conjunction with Mission Health and RHA Health Services. The initiative will provide comprehensive case management for people utilizing Mission’s emergency department for behavioral health needs, as well as women who are pregnant and using drugs or alcohol, and link them to community services and supports.

“Too often, people don’t connect with routine outpatient care that can prevent a behavioral health issue from becoming a crisis,” said RHA CEO Gordon J. Simmons. “In addition to RHA programs in neighboring counties, C3356 offers 24-hour behavioral health urgent care, counseling, medication management, substance use treatment and peer support services. These programs promote personal recovery and help prevent future crises.”

Nearly 600 people seek care for behavioral health needs at Mission’s ED every month. Some individuals needing psychiatric inpatient treatment wait at the ED for more than three days before a bed becomes available. Repeated visits are also becoming more problematic, with 230 individuals making a total of 770 visits during six months in 2016.

“We hope that over time we’ll reduce the use of the emergency department for those visits that are not necessary that can be addressed at a different level of care,” Vaya Health CEO Brian Ingraham said.

The program is expected to begin in July.

Vaya Health original News release_WNC initiative to promote mental health, reduce ED use

Drug Take Back Scheduled Saturday April 29th from 10am to 2pm in Asheville NC

The Partnership for Substance Free Youth of Buncombe County and RHA Prevention Resource Centers are sponsoring a Drug Take Back event on Saturday April 29th from 10am to 2pm at various locations in Asheville, NC. You can turn in your unused or expired medications for safe disposal. Did you know that most abused prescription drugs come from family and friends? You could be a drug dealer and not even know it! Read the Got Drugs? Take Back Flyer or download below for detailed instructions and join us on April 29th at our event.

Click here for a downloadable PDF of the Got Drugs? Take Back flyer 

The following locations will be participating:

Walgreens 1124 Patton Ave, Asheville
Walgreens 1835 Hendersonville Road, Asheville
Walgreens 91 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville
Walgreens 841 Merrimon Avenue, Asheville
Walgreens 578 New Leicester Highway, Asheville
SONA 805 Fairview Rd, Asheville

 The Partnership for Substance Free Youth in Buncombe County is a coalition of K-12 schools, private businesses, non-profit organizations and government agencies in Buncombe County and the greater Asheville area that is committed to keeping children away from alcohol and drugs.

RHA Prevention Resource Centers, formally known as Addiction Recovery and Prevention (ARP), has a long-standing tradition and expertise in providing drug use prevention services for youth, families, and communities across Western North Carolina (WNC). We believe decreasing risk and building protective factors in our youth and families is an integral part of tackling addiction.

For more information:

Phone: 828-348-2641
Email: Prevention@rhanet.org
RHA Prevention Resource Centers
84 Coxe Avenue, Ste 1-C Asheville, NC 28801

24-Hour Access and Crisis Telephone Contacts
828-586-5501 or 1-800-849-6127
Mobile Crisis Management
1-800-573-1006
Youth Suicide Hotline
1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)
or 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255)

 

RHA Continues Leadership Momentum with New CCO Danny F. Fulmer, II takes over as Chief Ethics, Compliance and Privacy Officer as 30 year RHA veteran, John S. White retires

Asheville, NC – February 13, 2017 – RHA Health Services, a leader in supports for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental health, and substance use challenges, is pleased to announce the addition of Danny F. Fulmer, II as the new Chief Ethics, Compliance and Privacy Officer (CCO). He succeeds 30 year RHA veteran, John S. White, who is retiring.  In his new position Mr. Fulmer will oversee the activities of the Ethics and Compliance, Privacy, Continuous Quality Improvements (CQI) and Safety departments.

The Georgia native graduated from the University of Georgia in 1994. He received his Executive MBA at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School in 2005, and his Juris Doctorate at Campbell University in 2008.  After law school he worked in Raleigh for five years litigating insurance defense and workers compensation cases with Cranfill, Sumner, and Hartzog, LLC.  Fulmer moved to Asheville in 2013 where he concentrated on medical malpractice defense and business litigation at Northup McConnell & Sizemore, PLLC. Fulmer most recently served Vaya Health (formerly Smoky Mountain LME/MCO) as the Ancillary Provider Network Manager.

RHA Health Services CEO,Gordon J. Simmons, says “Danny Fulmer will be taking over as Chief Ethics, Compliance, and Privacy Officer on March 27th 2017.  He comes to RHA with a wealth of knowledge and a diverse professional background, including his work as an attorney and most recently, as the Provider Relations Manager with Vaya Health.  Our Executive Team has the utmost confidence in Danny and firmly believes our Ethics, Compliance, and Privacy department will be in great hands for years to come.”

As Fulmer settles in at RHA, he reflects, “As our organization faces issues such as increased investigations, ever-changing privacy and security concerns caused by the evolution of technology, and the looming start date for Stage 3 Meaningful Use requirements by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (January 2018), it is more important than ever to realize that compliance has to be everyone’s concern.  The continued success of RHA will depend on our ability to collaborate effectively across all departments and continue to keep compliance and improvement at the forefront of all we do.

It is my vision that the compliance department will continue to focus our energy on the most effective ways to positively impact our company culture and to constantly evaluate whether our compliance program is working.  If we are able to obtain these objectives, it will certainly be because we stand on the shoulders of giants like John White.”

RHA Health Services provides a broad range of person-centered, integrated, and high-quality supports and services focused on children and adults living with intellectual & developmental disabilities and behavioral health and substance use challenges.  RHA has over 5,000 employees in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia. For more information regarding RHA Health Services, visit www.rhahealthservices.org.

Media Contact:
Debbie Valentine
RHA Health Services
Marketing and Communications
dvalentine@rhanet.org
919-803-2960 x 227

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